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When a Mongoose met a MicroPython, part II

Sergio R Caprile

In the first part of this blog, we introduced this little framework to integrate MicroPython and Cesanta's Mongoose; where Mongoose runs when called by MicroPython and is able to run Python functions as callbacks for the events you decide in your event handler. Now we add MQTT to the equation, so we can subscribe to topics and publish messages right from MicroPython.


ANCS and HID: Controlling Your iPhone From Zephyr

Mohammed Billoo

In this blog post, we see how certain BLE services can be used to control an iPhone from a Nordic nRF52840 using The Zephyr Project. Specifically, we see how to control certain multimedia functionality using the HID service. Finally, we learn how to use the ANCS client library provided by Nordic in The Zephyr Project to accept or decline an incoming call.


You Don't Need an RTOS (Part 3)

Nathan Jones

In this third article I'll share with you a few cooperative schedulers (with a mix of both free and commercial licenses) that implement a few of the OS primitives that the "Superduperloop" is currently missing, possibly giving you a ready-to-go solution for your system. On the other hand, I don't think it's all that hard to add thread flags, binary and counting semaphores, event flags, mailboxes/queues, a simple Observer pattern, and something I call a "marquee" to the "Superduperloop"; I'll show you how to do that in the second half of this article and the next. Although it will take a little more work than just using one of the projects above, it will give you the maximum amount of control over your system and it will let you write tasks in ways you could only dream of using an RTOS or other off-the-shelf system.


Core competencies

Colin Walls

Creating software from scratch is attractive, as the developer has total control. However, this is rarely economic or even possible with complex systems and tight deadlines.


FSM - Let 'em talk

Massimiliano Pagani

No state machine is an island. State machines do not exist in a vacuum, they need to "talk" to their environment and each other to share information and provide synchronization to perform the system functions. In this conclusive article, you will find what kind of problems and which critical areas you need to pay attention to when designing a concurrent system. Although the focus is on state machines, the consideration applies to every system that involves more than one execution thread.


Getting Started With CUDA C on an Nvidia Jetson: A Meaningful Algorithm

Mohammed Billoo

In this blog post, I demonstrate a use case and corresponding GPU implementation where meaningful performance gains are realized and observed. Specifically, I implement a "blurring" algorithm on a large 1000x1000 pixel image. I show that the GPU-based implementation is 1000x faster than the CPU-based implementation.


Five Embedded Linux Topics for Newbies !

George Emad

Are you an embedded systems enthusiast looking to broaden your horizons with embedded Linux? explore those 5 topics.


Introduction to PIC Timers

Luther Stanton

The fourth in a series of five posts looks at 8-bit PIC hardware timers. After a review of basic timer functionality, the Timer0 module operation and configuration is reviewed and a basic application implemented using Timer0 to blink external LEDs at a frequency of 0.5Hz.


You Don't Need an RTOS (Part 2)

Nathan Jones

In this second article, we'll tweak the simple superloop in three critical ways that will improve it's worst-case response time (WCRT) to be nearly as good as a preemptive RTOS ("real-time operating system"). We'll do this by adding task priorities, interrupts, and finite state machines. Additionally, we'll discuss how to incorporate a sleep mode when there's no work to be done and I'll also share with you a different variation on the superloop that can help schedule even the toughest of task sets.